All posts by Carl Batt

Sometimes is it just a great picture

by

Nanotechnology has contributed to the advances in our ability to see different things at the nanoscale.  Microscopy has advanced from the very early days of microscopes being a single glass lens to very advanced instruments with nanometer resolution.  We can see lots of stuff with ... Read More...

You could mow your lawn at night

by

Scientists from MIT and the University of California have figured out a way to engineer plants to glow in the dark. This isn't the first time but it is the first time that it has been on whole plants without initially do some tricky genetics.  ... Read More...

May the force be with you

by

Mostly everything has a nano-unit measurement including sounds.  The human ear can hear things down to around 0 decibels.   If you are about 100 feet from a jet as it takes off that is about 150 decibels.  Your headphones can be cranked up to around ... Read More...

Flexing your mussel

by

Before you call the typo police, we are talking mussels, not muscles.  Researchers at Purdue University have developed an adhesive that is based upon the same stuff that mussels use to stay stuck to wooden poles, rocks and other places that mussels like to ... Read More...

Float like a drone, pollinate like a bee

by

Bees carry out important work by pollinating flowers---they move pollen from one part of the flower to another or between flowers.  They contribute something like $29 billion dollars to the farm economy in the US alone.  For a number of reasons the bee population is ... Read More...

Nanotechnology and noodles

by

Sometimes science can just be fun if not edible.  Scientists at MIT have developed a process to make pasta that shape-shifts upon cooking.  They claim it could save on shipping costs because you might be able to pack these flat noodles into a smaller ... Read More...

Even smaller!

by

Making computer parts smaller and smaller is the reason why your average laptop is a zillion times more powerful than computers from 50 years ago that used to fill up an entire room.  The basic component of a computer chip is a transistor which is ... Read More...

Shining light on nanocubes

by

Methane is the building block of a lot of different fuels.  There are a variety of methanes sources (think cows!) but on source of methane is to make it from carbon dioxide.  There is lots of carbon dioxide but converting it to methane requires energy. ... Read More...

Fixing broken neurons

by

Spinal injuries can be devastating with the loss of movement in arms and legs.  The primary problem is damage to neurons, those cells that transmit signals to and from the brain.  There have been many attempts to fix neurons.  Scientists at MIT have developed a ... Read More...

Slick!

by

Nature provides a lot of inspiration for making things on the nanoscale.  We have evolution to help get the design right and then if we are smart enough we can go into the lab figure out how it works and copy it.  Things like gecko ... Read More...

A nano super hero

by

Scientists come in all shapes, sizes and colors.  One of the super heros of nanotechnology died last week.  Mildred Dresselhaus.  Who?  Dresselhaus was one of the pioneers in the discovery of carbon nanotubes and predicted their existence long before anyone even saw one.  Carbon ... Read More...

Let there be light

by

Windows! they let us look out on the world from our room and see all sorts of stuff.  But could windows do more?  Researchers have used nanotechnology to create efficient solar collectors which can collect energy from the sun.  They make tiny silicon nanoparticles that ... Read More...

really, they use a cotton candy machine?

by

Scientists at Vanderbilt University have discovered a new use for the machine that is used to make cotton candy.  Cotton candy is basically sugar that is spun into thin fibers.  The cotton candy machine was invented by William Morrison a dentist in collaboration with a ... Read More...

Tiny bubbles

by

Tiny bubbles are fun things when you find them in soft drinks where they tickle your nose.  Tiny bubble can also be used to clean fruits and vegetables removing bacteria that might cause food-borne illness.  Scientists at Virginia Tech University have used cavitation ... Read More...

Happy holidays

by

To celebrate the holiday season, why not some art?  The image is gold nanowires that are being 'grown' on silicon.  Nanowires are important for a variety of microelectronics.  To grow them scientists have to perfect the recipe by trying different combinations of ... Read More...

Invisible fish

by

Fishing is a tricky business because fish are smart.  Well maybe not 'smart' but they can do things to protect themselves from predators who are trying eat them.  Scientists at the University of Texas have discovered that the skin of certain ... Read More...

Nano-bio-wires (or is it bio-nano-wires?)

by

Sometimes the best solutions come out of unlikely sources.  Deep within what most folks would consider muck, scientists have found a way to trick a special kind of bacteria to make tiny wires that are made up of just amino acids.  Non-toxic ... Read More...

Bioinspired materials

by

Sometimes nature provides the best examples of how to make new nanometer scale materials especially where there is a particular function.  Think about how geckos can climb up walls and you can imagine how studying their feet might lead to new adhesives (including things ... Read More...

Clean(er) energy

by

Clean energy is a good thing.   We need energy to power a lot of things around us (like cars and iPhones) but we also don't want to harm the environment by putting things like carbon monoxide into the atmosphere.  A number of energy producing devices ... Read More...